AFRICAN/AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES COURSE OFFERINGS
FALL 2003
GENERAL COURSE OFFERINGS
Course Title Time/Place Day Instructor
ENGL 255 African American Lit 1100AM-1215PM
MPA 122
T R TAYLOR
HUMA 314 African Humanities 1100AM-1215PM
MPB125
TR EJIAGA
HUMA 315 African Humanities 0800AM-0915AM
MPB123
TR MYRICK
HIST 351 Afr Am Hist to 1865 1230PM-0145PM
CLK214
TR JAMES
HIST 352 Afr Am Hist since 1865 0715PM-0830PM
MPA217
MW STAFF
HIST 355 Hist of West Af 0550PM-0705PM
MPA217
MW EFESOA
HIST 470 Seminar/AFRI Am Hist 1200PM-1250PM
CLK208
MWF JAMES
HIST 475 Seminar in Colonial Cari 0715PM-0830PM
MPA247
TR JACK
FIAR 354 AFRICAN ART HISTORY 0550PM-0820PM
MPA126
W STAFF

COURSES OFFERED

ART:

354 - AFRICAN ART, Credit, 3 hours. This is a study of African art in historical perspective as well as in cultural context, with attention to mediums, stylistic considerations, museum collections, contemporary African art, and opportunities for further study.

450 -AFRICAN AMERICAN ART, Credit, 3 hours. This course is a survey of the development of African American art and its contribution to the plastic arts in the United States.

489 - ZAIRE ART SEMINAR, Credit, 3 hours. In this seminar, students will study the history, cultural context and aesthetics of Zaire Art. They will get hands on curatorial experience with SUNO’s Zaire Art Collection).

EDUCATION:

275 - MULTICULTURAL ISSUES AND TRENDS IN, credit, 3 hours. This course is designed to provide a comprehensive and in-depth exploration of pertinent topics with an emphasis on effective instructional decisions and favorable learning environments for students of diversified cultural heritage.

473 - STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR: EDUCATION IN URBAN MULTICULTURAL SETTINGS, credit, 3 hours. This required core course is taken concurrently with student teaching and focuses on the pre-professional development of an enhanced knowledge base and performance skills to deal effectively and reflectively with educational and sociocultural considerations inherent to urban multicultural school settings.

ENGLISH:

255 - AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE 1, credit, 3 hours. This is a thematic and cultural study of the literature dealing with the African-American experience from the Colonial period to the Harlem Renaissance.

256 - AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE II, credit, 3 hours. This is a thematic and cultural study of the literature dealing with the African-American experience from the end of the Harlem Renaissance to the present.

257 - AFRICAN LITERATURE I, credit, 3 hours. This is a survey of African folk literature, fiction, drama and poetry as they reflect the African cultural experience.

258 - AFRICAN LITERATURE II, credit, 3 hours. This is a study of the relationship between geography, politics, religion, music, the applied arts and African literary forms, styles, techniques, themes.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES:

440 - BLACK WRITERS OF FRENCH EXPRESSION, credit, 3 hours. Introduction to Black Writers of French Expression from Africa and the Caribbean Area.

GEOGRAPHY:

111 - GEOGRAPHY OF AFRICA, credit, 3 hours. This course is a regional study of Africa with emphasis on topography, climate, and natural resources, including the settlement, cultural, economic and political problems of Africa.

HISTORY:

306 - READINGS IN CARIBBEAN HISTORY, credit, 3 hours. This reading course is designed to examine the history of the Caribbean since 1500. The course also provides an opportunity to read the literature on the impact of Old and New World forces on the people and politics of the Caribbean, the West, and its institutions.

351 - AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY, credit, 3 hours. This is a study of the African American background to Reconstruction with emphasis on the effects of its interaction with other groups upon American thought, institutions, and practices.

352 - AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1865, credit, 3 hours. This course is a study of the various problems of African Americans as they exercised their rights from the era of Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis will be placed on their changing status and contributions to American Society.

354 - HISTORY OF AFRICA TO 1800, credit, 3 hours. This is a study of Africa to 1800 social, political, economic and cultural developments and the tenacity of African institutions.

355 - HISTORY OF WEST AFRICA, credit, 3 hours. This course will examine West Africa from ancient to modern times. Major emphasis will be on the dynamics of trade and politics on the West African coast, and the European imperial connection until the time of independence.

356 - HISTORY OF EAST AFRICA, credit, 3 hours. This course surveys East Africa and the evolution of Man, the migrations, and development of political, social and cultural institutions, foreign intervention, the Arab slave trade, European colonization, and the emergence of African nationalism and independence movement.

359 - GREAT EMPIRES OF AFRICA, credit, 3 hours. This course surveys the European myths in connection with the origins of the states, the evolution of states in Africa, the forest states of West Africa, the States of Western Sudan, Central Africa, and the Swahili States of East Africa.

375 - HISTORY OF AFRICA SINCE 1800, credit, 3 hours. This course examines the political, social, economic and cultural developments in Africa since 1800 - colonialism, the struggle for independence, and the post-independence era.

405 - AFRICAN SOCIAL HISTORY, credit, 3 hours. This is a study of selected themes of African social history, which includes urbanization, class formation, cultural change, social movements and protests, migration, and labor movements.

407 - HISTORY OF SOUTHERN AFRICA, credit, 3 hours. This course is a study of the African peoples of South Africa, namely the San, Khoi, Xhosa, Zulus etc., their political, social and economic organization. The conquest of Chaka, the Zulu king and the Mfecane until the arrival of the Dutch invaders in 1652 , relations between the invaders and Africans.

409 - ANCIENT AFRICAN HISTORY, credit, 3 hours. This course explores the African origins of humanity, emphasizing ancient African societies and civilizations, especially those of Ethiopia, Egypt, and West Africa.

411 - AFRICAN AMERICAN RELIGIOUS HISTORY, credit, 3 hours. This course is an examination of the religious life of African Americans from the period of slavery to the present.

412 - AFRICA AND THE SLAVE TRADE, credit, 3 hours. This course focuses on the social, economic, political, and cultural impact of the slave trade in African society.

416 - ISLAM IN TROPICAL AFRICA, credit, 3 hours. This course is a study of Islam in tropical Africa, and its political, social, economic and cultural influence on the African people.

470 - SEMINAR IN AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY, credit, 3 hours. This course is an investigation and interpretation of the major intellectual developments and programs, which have emerged from the African American experience in the United States. A research paper examining some phase of African American History is required of each student.

475 - SEMINAR IN COLONIAL CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL HISTORY, credit, 3 hours. This course is designed to examine the historical, cultural and economic forces indigenous to the Caribbean colonies since 1500. The course also provides an opportunity to study the impact of Old and New World forces on the people and politics of the Caribbean, the West, and its institutions.

HUMANITIES:

314 - AFRICAN HUMANITIES, credit, 3 hours. This is a study of the African contribution to the world of arts and ideas.

315 - AFRICAN AMERICAN HUMANITIES, credit, 3 hours. The course offers the history of African Americans involvement in and contributions to American stage, television and film, from minstrel shows to the present.

451 - CARIBBEAN CULTURE AND POLITICS, credit, 3 hours. This course is an investigation of the roles culture and politics have played in the development of the Caribbean basin. Emphasis will be placed on the ways African cultural survival; Creolism, synchronism, and political struggle have acted to create the unique Caribbean perspective since slavery.

453 - AFRICA AND THE BLACK DIASPORA, credit, 3 hours. This course gives a general introduction to the parallelism and differences in the literature, thought, and cultural worlds of both contemporary Africa and the African descended communities.

MUSIC:

244 - THE MUSIC OF AFRICANS/AFRICAN AMERICANS, credit, 3 hours. The purpose of this course is to afford students a real understanding of the nature and scope of the history of African/African American music and its impact on Western music generally and twentieth century specifically.

PHILOSOPHY:

314 - AFRICAN PHILOSOPHY, credit, 3 hours. This is a study of the nature of ethical judgments, standards, and values along with an historical survey of ethical theories.

POLITICAL SCIENCE:

250 - GLOBAL ISSUES, credit, 3 hours. A series of lectures, videos and guest presentations on the leading issues facing the world community. The content of the course will be constantly updated by varying the issues examined. The approach to the issues will be interdisciplinary.

310 - AFRICAN AMERICAN POLITICS, credit, 3 hours. This course is a study of the issues in African American politics with attention focused on overall goals, public policy objectives.

390 - DYNAMICS OF AFRICAN AMERICAN LEADERSHIP, credit, 3 hours. This course is an interdisciplinary honors seminar, designed to examine the etiology, structure, and functions of African American leadership as it relates to the social, political, economic and cultural advancement of the total African American community and society at large.

430 - POLITICS OF THE DEVELOPING NATIONS, credit, 3 hours. This is a study of theories and processes of political development and modernization with particular attention given to the issues and problems common to the nations of Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

432 - COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS, credit, 3 hours. This course is a comparative study of modern political institutions and processes in Great Britain, France, Russia, Germany, Japan, and Nigeria.

PSYCHOLOGY:

344 - SEMINAR IN BLACK PSYCHOLOGY, credit, 3 hours. This course is an analysis of psychological forces differentially affecting the African Americans, specifically with regard to hereditary intelligence, learning theory, scholastic performance, psychopathology, and social action.

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK:

270 - INSTITUTIONAL RACISM IN THE U.S., credit, 3 hours. This course is an examination of racism and all of its manifestations, the nature and significance of racism in American life, its historical developments; the economical, political and psychological attitudes; and, institutional practices

SOCIOLOGY:

221 - RACE AND CONTEMPORARY AMERICA, credit, 3 hours. This course is designed to identify and study the multifaceted nature of contemporary social problems and the races in contemporary society.

340 - KEY ISSUES IN AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT, credit, 3 hours. The course introduces students to the basic structural problems and policy responses of social and economic development on the African continent, especially south of the Sahara. The history of exploitation, post-independence development efforts and the rapidly changing international political and economic order will also be reviewed using various case studies.

344 - AFRICAN RELIGIONS, credit, 3 hours. This course is a critical examination of major African religions that have influenced North and South America and the Caribbean.

345 - AFRICAN AMERICAN CHURCH, credit, 3 hours. This course is the study of the African American church beginning with the earliest established denominations, and the history of the church’s role in the anti-slavery movement, Reconstruction, the Civil Rights period, and the Black Nationalist period.

346 - SOCIOLOGY OF RACE AND ETHNICITY, credit, 3 hours. This course is designed to acknowledge the African origin of all human beings, and to understand that race is a social construction, which must be distinguished from the concept of ethnicity, based on culture. This course explains the relevance of race, gender and class linkages, and shows that it is in all aspects of social location and all forms of interaction. Whenever race connects with class and gender, race may be the more strategic variable. Hence “race matters” in all of life we experience and race always will be a defining attribute in societies, especially with some “faces at the bottom of the well”.

352 - PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF AFRICA, credit, 3 hours. This course provides a general anthropological survey of the various basic ethnic groups and subsistence patterns of sub-Saharan Africa. The basic subsistence patterns to be covered are (1) hunters/gathers, (2) pastoralists, (3) subsistence/cash crop farmers, (4) trading/merchant geography, climate, history, cultural change, migration and urbanization.

363 - WOMEN AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN AFRICA, credit, 3 hours. This course is a survey of the involvement of African women in national movements and in various social-political activities beginning with the struggle for independence to date.